Cornyn, Feinstein Bill to Stop Chemical Companies & Pharmacies Who Break Rules from Selling Controlled Substances Heads to President’s Desk


In: All News   Posted 07/28/2021
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WASHINGTON –U.S. Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) released the following statements after their Debarment Enforcement of Bad Actor Registrants (DEBAR) Act passed the Senate unanimously last night:

“Thousands of Texans die each year from opioid overdoses, and the pandemic has exacerbated the grip drugs like fentanyl have on our communities,” said Sen. Cornyn. “This legislation would stop those who have been barred from selling drugs by the DEA from skirting the law and help stop the distribution of opioids by bad actors.”

“Our country’s opioid epidemic is fueled by individuals and organizations who abuse their authority to provide prescription drugs, especially pain medications. This bill would make it easier for the DEA to prevent anyone who loses their registration to manufacture, distribute or dispense these drugs due to misconduct from reapplying for this authority in the future. I’m glad that Congress has passed it and look forward to the president signing it. This will save lives,” said Sen. Feinstein.

The Debarment Enforcement of Bad Actor Registrants (DEBAR) Act passed the U.S. House of Representatives 411-5 in April.
 

Background:

CDC preliminary data indicates that overdose deaths were up almost 30 percent in 2020, likely caused by the proliferation of fentanyl and increased isolation and stress from the COVID-19 pandemic. Last year, more than 92,000 Americans died from drug overdoses.

The Debarment Enforcement of Bad Actor Registrants (DEBAR) Act would give the Drug Enforcement Administration debarment authority, conditionally or unconditionally, to prohibit bad actors from reapplying to obtain a registration to manufacture, distribute, or dispense a controlled substance.  This gives the DEA an additional tool to prevent bad actors from skirting the law and obtaining a license after being suspended.