Cornyn, Feinstein Urge State Department to Minimize Disruption to U.S.-Mexico Supply Chain


In: All News   Posted 04/29/2020
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WASHINGTON— U.S. Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) today sent a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urging him to request the Mexican government clarify their definition of essential businesses to resolve uncertainty in the U.S.-Mexico supply chain during the coronavirus pandemic. Joining them were Senators Martha McSally (R-AZ), Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), David Perdue (R-GA), Joni Ernst (R-IA), Ted Cruz (R-TX), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), James Lankford (R-OK), and Jeff Merkley (D-OR).

They wrote: “We write to urge the State Department to coordinate with the Mexican government to clarify Mexico’s definition of essential businesses to avoid disruptions in the U.S. supply chain.”

“As Mexico continues its own shutdown of ‘non-essential activities’ to reduce the spread of COVID-19, it has become clear that our integrated supply chains will continue to suffer disruptions unless the Mexican government clarifies its definition of ‘essential businesses.’ We particularly urge you to press your Mexican counterparts to incorporate industries providing components to the food, medical, transportation, infrastructure, aerospace, automotive, and defense sectors into their guidance.”

“As demonstrated by the ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement last year, our countries remain committed to securing mutual economic prosperity. It is in this same spirit of economic cooperation we urge the State Department to engage with the Mexican government to protect the stability of U.S. supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

You can view the signed letter here, and text is below.

April 29, 2020

The Honorable Michael R. Pompeo
Secretary of State
Department of State
2201 C Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20520

Dear Secretary Pompeo:

We write to urge the State Department to coordinate with the Mexican government to clarify Mexico’s definition of essential businesses to avoid disruptions in the U.S. supply chain. The United States imported $346.1 billion worth of goods from Mexico in 2018; as such, Mexico serves an integral role in the U.S. supply chain and is crucial to the functioning of essential American businesses, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As Mexico continues its own shutdown of “non-essential activities” to reduce the spread of COVID-19, it has become clear that our integrated supply chains will continue to suffer disruptions unless the Mexican government clarifies its definition of “essential businesses.” We particularly urge you to press your Mexican counterparts to incorporate industries providing components to the food, medical, transportation, infrastructure, aerospace, automotive, and defense sectors into their guidance. Consistent direction from Mexico to its manufacturers would improve the U.S. economy because our domestic companies would find it easier to secure alternate sources for their products.

The U.S.-Mexico partnership is built on shared values and deep economic and cultural bonds. As demonstrated by the ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement last year, our countries remain committed to securing mutual economic prosperity. It is in this same spirit of economic cooperation we urge the State Department to engage with the Mexican government to protect the stability of U.S. supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both nations will only be able to reduce the economic impact of this global challenge through increased coordination, and ensuring functioning supply chains is a vital step in doing so.

Thank you for your consideration.  We look forward to continuing to work with you as our nation responds to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Sincerely,

/s/