Cornyn: House Slow-Walking Police Protection for SCOTUS Justices & Families


In: All News   Posted 05/12/2022
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After some negotiations, we were able to get this passed unanimously by the United States Senate. But it's currently hung up in the House, based on, I think, a misguided effort to include even law clerks of the Court.

"I shudder to think what might happen if the Supreme Court members and their family are denied this sort of protection, which the Senate has unanimously supported, because it gets slow-walked in the House"

WASHINGTON – Today in the Senate Judiciary Committee, U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) discussed his Supreme Court Police Parity Act and a doomed-to-fail effort from House Democrats to expand the scope of the bill. Excerpts of Sen. Cornyn’s remarks are below, and video can be found here.

“After some negotiations, we were able to get this passed unanimously by the United States Senate. But it's currently hung up in the House, based on, I think, a misguided effort to include even law clerks of the Court.”

“There's some 40 law clerks on the Court. Nobody knows who they are. They're not protesting at their house. They're not threatening them with violence. But they are members of the Court, along with their families.”

“Right now, we have two Justices with young families. When Justice Jackson is sworn in, that will make three Judges. She will benefit from this Police Parity Act.”

“I just want to remind my colleagues, this does nothing except give the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court families the same protection members of Congress have. In other words, it provides powers that already exist for the Capitol Police to provide personal protection for members of Congress, but the Supreme Court does not have that sort of protection.”

“I hope our colleagues who have some influence with the members of the House, particularly the House leadership, will encourage them to get this bill out the door today. I shudder to think what might happen if the Supreme Court members and their family are denied this sort of protection, which the Senate has unanimously supported, because it gets slow-walked in the House.”